Paraphrasing in social work

Paraphrasing in social work

By: apafelpCami Date of post: 02-Oct-2017
Effective paraphrasing - Columbia School of Social Work

Effective paraphrasing - Columbia School of Social Work

Effective paraphrasing. A paraphrase is • Your own version of the meaning of the ideas and/or information of someone else; a very few essential words of the. The Social Work Interview, Fifth Edition by Alfred Kadushin and Goldie. “Paraphrasing is a selective reinstatement of the main ideas that resemble but is not. Mar 3, 2017. Why Reflecting and Paraphrasing Are Important Communication Tools. A social worker may say, “This case is driving me crazy.” You may.

The Social Work Interview - Book Review - SocialWork. Career

The Social Work Interview - Book Review - SocialWork. Career

Nov 1, 2012. B. A skill that enables the social worker to seek specificity on what the client. A best fits the term paraphrasing which can be used to illustrate. Jul 21, 2009. Encouragers, paraphrases and summaries are basic to helping a client. Am a student social worker,i need help an an able to listen to get the. VIDEO EXAMPLES OF PARAPHRASING. In video example #1 James, the social worker says “Okay, okay. So, from your point of view then, if your mom would.

The Importance of Paraphrasing and Reflecting - The Spruce

The Importance of Paraphrasing and Reflecting - The Spruce

Sep 27, 2012. Short skit for our Social Work 102 presentation demonstrating active listening skills. Reflecting is the process of paraphrasing and restating both the feelings and. Paraphrasing involves using other words to reflect what the speaker has said.

Useful Communications Skills — How to Paraphrase and Summarize
Useful Communications Skills — How to Paraphrase and Summarize

Jan 26, 2012. Two very useful skills in communicating with others, including when coaching and facilitating, are paraphrasing and summarizing the thoughts. To paraphrase is to restate the same information the client has said in different words. Paraphrasing allows the client to focus on the content of what he or she is.